Internships, fellowships, and scholar programs

Applications for internships, fellowships, and scholar programs often can feel intimidating Applications can feel arduous, extensive, and there is the chance that the long hours of dedication can seem futile. However, this is a detrimental way to look at applications and there are ways to help make the process less intimidating and more constructive. To complement the “Application Checklist” that many fellowships offer on their websites, here is my own checklist to follow before you begin your dream application:

1. Go to information sessions. McDaniel is offering an increasing number of presentations with tips on how to complete applications. If you look at campus announcements or notice the posters in academic buildings, there is at least one session a month dedicated to revising a cover letter or filling out an application on a specific fellowship (such as the Fulbright Program or the Critical Language Scholarship). In addition to taking advantage of these McDaniel opportunities, many major programs offer webinars with valuable advice. These webinars are free information sessions presented by the very same people who will be looking at your application- sign up for these! You can ask questions through the webinar and the presenters often give tips that are unique to their application. Research your scholarship/fellowship as much as possible!

2. Look for examples of successful applicants. Researching examples of successful essays or cover letters can help you take a first step in your application. Don’t plagiarize- this is wrong. However, it is interesting to look at the vast variety of essays and this might inspire you to find your essay topic. For example, when I had an annoying case of writer’s block, I read by friend’s essay about her trip to France and her memory of looking at the Eiffel Tower for the first time. This sparked my memory about my trip to Australia. My writer’s block was “unblocked” and I began to write my essay on my tete-a-tete with a random Australian on the street.

3. Think outside the box- While the most famous programs such as the Truman Scholars Program or the Rhodes Scholarships are phenomenal, they are also extremely selective and competitive. If your dream is to be a Rhodes Scholar, I will not discourage you from applying. However, make sure to look at other opportunities that are less well known; they might even be better suited for your major and interests. I pride myself in my professional Googling skills and I have spent hours on a peace and conflict professional forum finding links to fellowships with a focus in this particular field. However, if you do not want to spend this amount of time and energy invested in online research, ask your professors for ideas. In addition, at McDaniel, the wonderful CEO Office spoils us. If you visit the amazing staff at the CEO, you will find that they have already completed the research for you (there is even a comprehensive book with a list of fellowships complete with deadlines and instructions). Capitalize on these resources.

4. Visit the Writing Center! I might be a little biased, but the Writing Center is a fantastic place to visit for each step in the application process (and I hear the tutors are pretty cool). Whether you need help brainstorming essay topics or want one more pair of eyes to look over your final draft an hour before the application’s deadline, the Writing Center is always here for you. You may also want to politely ask professors, friends, and family look over your application in order to receive as much feedback as possible.

5. Do it for the experience. Think of the application process as an experience; don’t be negative! This is an opportunity to talk about your favorite class or discuss the volunteering event where you stapled papers for a non-profit organization and interacted with the president of the organization while reaching for a whole punch. The applications do not have to be boring and even have the potential to be enjoyable. Even if you have difficulty enjoying the application, think of it as a learning experience. If you do not receive the scholarship or fellowship, you have essays and the experience for future applications. And who knows, maybe the next time you apply, you might surprise yourself.

Leanna, peer tutor

Scoring That Perfect Internship

Boat rides on the Chesapeake Bay, picnics out on a dock, wooden boats and crab picking demonstrations. Sound like a weekend trip out to the Eastern Shore of Maryland? Not quite, but when your summer internship is something that you love, it may as well be a vacation.

This summer, I worked for the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum as a communications and marketing intern. I got to do things that I love, like use social media, take pictures and video with professional equipment, and write for the museum’s magazine, all while spending most of my time outside and on the water. I got to produce videos for the website and talk to interesting people, like this video about the cultural influences of crabbing and the people who grew up around the Chesapeake:

But aside from all of the fun stuff that I got to do, I really did learn a lot about working in the professional world. With my internship, I had the freedom to come up with my own ideas, make them a reality, and then present them to my boss in the hopes that she would like them and use them as publicity for the museum. Through this process, I learned a lot about my own work from the feedback that my boss would give me, so I could go back and make improvements to the project I was working on.

It is great to get in the habit of taking your work to someone for review because they always have fresh ideas about how to make it better. If I made a video, I would take it to my boss afterwards and show her what I had done, always expecting feedback and new ideas for making it even better.

At The Writing Center, we can help you get used to this process of writing and editing; we’ll work with you to improve your skills so you can make your own work even more awesome. Having a tutor look at your paper or assignment is (almost) just like the process you will encounter in the professional world– except meeting with us is probably a little more fun and less nerve-racking.

Along with helping you get acquainted with this process, The Writing Center can also help you perfect your resume or application for scoring that perfect internship. You can make an appointment with a tutor who will help you make sure that all of your accomplishments are presented well in a resume that future employers will see.

If you are interested in finding an awesome summer internship, the Center for Experience and Opportunity (CEO) has resources to help you with that. You can check them out on www.facebook.com/McDaniel.CEO or follow them on Twitter @McDanielCEO.

So don’t forget to make your appointment at The Writing Center to help develop your professional skills and to talk about the cool internships you are applying for!

Lauren, peer tutor